Podcasts

Bits of History Podcasts

From a look at early Spanish exploration of the mountains to an overview of the life and times of Jim Hunt to a deep dive into the development of the banjo, our Bits of History podcasts cover a wide range of subjects related to the North Carolina's history and culture.

Most of our podcasts are divided by time period and you can use the links below to jump to the era that interests you most:

Exploration and Early Settlement | Colonial Era and Revolutionary War | The Federal Period | Antebellum Era | The Civil War and Reconstruction | Twentieth Century

Some others were created in tandem with particular exhibits or don't easily fall into a category.

*Users can download podcasts by putting their cursor on the link to the podcast, right-clicking, and choosing “Save link as” (if using Mozilla Firefox) or "Save target as" (if using Internet Explorer).

    Exploration and Early Settlement

    Exploring Fort San Juan, a talk by David G. Moore, professor of archaeology and anthropology, Warren Wilson College

    Moore discusses the history and archaeological evidence surrounding Fort San Juan and the Spanish settlements in western North Carolina that predate the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island by nearly 20 years. Approximate run time: 52 minutes.

    John Lawson’s Exploration of the Carolinas, a conversation with Jeanne Marie Warzeski, North Carolina Museum of History

    John Lawson an English explorer, surveyor, and naturalist, journeyed through the Carolinas backcountry in 1701 and 1702. To commemorate the 300th anniversary of the publication of Lawson’s A New Voyage to Carolina, the North Carolina Museum of History opened a new exhibit, A New Land, "A New Voyage": John Lawson’s Exploration of Carolina.” Warzeski, curator of colonial and antebellum history, discusses John Lawson’s contributions to history and natural science. Approximate run time: 22 minutes.

    Colonial Era and the Revolutionary War

    American Indians and the American Revolution, a conversation with Colin Calloway, professor of History and professor of Native American Studies, Dartmouth College

    Calloway discusses how, during the American Revolution, some tribes supported the British, while others supported the colonists and many tried to stay neutral. Regardless of their allegiance, few historical events had a more profound impact on American Indian peoples. Approximate run time: 33 minutes.

    Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse, a conversation with historian and author Joshua B. Howard

    In Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guildford Courthouse, historian Josh Howard, who cowrote the book with Lawrence E. Babits, hopes to provide a new starting point for students and scholars. In addition to providing an accurate account of the battle, the book attempts to correct long-standing myths while building awareness of the southern campaign during the Revolutionary War and the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in particular. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

    A Pirate’s Life for Me? a lecture by Charles Ewen, East Carolina University

    Professor Ewen compares and contrasts the historical record of piracy using film and popular literature on the one hand, and historical documents and archaeology on the other. Their differences, in some cases, may not be as far apart as one might think. Approximate run time: 55 minutes.

    Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788, a conversation with historian and author Pauline Maier

    Few things in American history approach mythical status like the creation of the U.S. Constitution. Pauline Maier, a distinguish professor of history at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, finally documents the untold stories and the personalities who fought both for and against its adoption. Approximate run time: 26 minutes.

    The Federal Period

    The Ambidexter Philosopher: Thomas Jefferson in Black Thought, 1776-1877, a Perspectives on History lecture by Mia Bay, Rutgers University

    Professor Bay examines African Americans' changing ideas about Thomas Jefferson between the American Revolution and the post-emancipation era. Approximate run time: 1 hour 2 minutes.

    The War of 1812: A Forgotten War?, an interview with Donald Hickey, professor of history at Wayne State College, Wayne, Nebraska

    Most Americans don’t remember much about the War of 1812 from their school days; yet the conflict proved to be important in many ways and helped forge American identity. Approximate run time: 22 minutes.

    Justice James Iredell,an interview with author, attorney, and former North Carolina Supreme Court justice Willis Whichard

    Justice Willis Whichard talks about his book, Justice James Iredell, the only comprehensive biography examining Iredell and his impact as lawyer, judge, essayist, political philosopher, and member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Approximate run time: 25 minutes.

    Antebellum Era

    Appraised, Bartered, and Sold: The Value of Human Chattels, a Perspectives on History lecture by Daina Ramey Berry, Michigan State University

    Berry discusses slave prices in the antebellum South, exploring both planters’ criteria and slaves’ perceptions of their value. Berry’s research reveals interesting patterns with contemporary relevance to slave insurance claims and reparations. Approximate run time: 1 hour.

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    The North Carolina State Capitol, a conversation with Terra Schramm, North Carolina Historic Sites

    The North Carolina State Capitol was a seat of government that was nomadic for much of its early history. After the original State House in Raleigh was destroyed by a fire in 1831, the General Assembly ordered that a new and enlarged capitol be built. Terra Schramm, the education and outreach coordinator for the State Capitol discusses the history, architecture, personalities, and legends behind the building and grounds. Approximate run time: 23 minutes.

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    Was I Born for This? North Carolina Slave Voices,a talk given byLucinda MacKethan, Professor of English Emerita, North Carolina State University

    MacKethan discusses the way in which African American writers in the 19th century fought against slavery and racism using the power of the written word. She includes the narratives of Harriet Jacobs, Moses Roper, and Lunsford Lane and the poetry of George Moses Horton. Approximate run time: 1 hour 2 minutes.

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    The Civil War and Reconstruction

    Civil War Regugees and the Struggle for Freedom, a talk by Chandra Manning, associate professor of History at Georgetown University, about her new book, "Troubled Refuge: Struggling for Freedom in the Civil War."

    Manning discusses how enslaved people escaped to Union held territory during the Civil War and the system of refugee camps that were established. 

    Abraham Lincoln and a House Divided, a lecture by Sanford Kessler, North Carolina State University

    Professor Kessler uses Abraham Lincoln’s famous 1858 “House Divided” speech to unravel Lincoln’s political and personal views on slavery. Approximate run time: 53 minutes.

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    Albion Tourgee, Thomas Dixon, and Memory of Reconstruction, a talk by Mark Elliott, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

    As part of a symposium commemorating the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War, Professor Elliott compares the lasting legacy and influences of two influential writers of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Both men struggled to shape an image of the South and Reconstruction—one of emancipation and realism and another of Southern honor and occupation. Approximate run time: 32 minutes.

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    Charles Chesnutt and Questions of Race in American Fiction, a conversation with Charles S. Duncan, professor of English, William Peace University

    Charles Chesnutt was the first major African American fiction writer who tackled the issue of race as a realist. Writing with complexity, irony, and personal insight, his work maintains its relevancy for today’s readers. Approximate run time: 31 minutes.

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    The Confederate Secret Services,a conversation withW. Patrick Lang, novelist, retired U.S. Army colonel, and military intelligence consultant

    Patrick Lang discusses his two novels, The Butcher’s Cleaver and Death Piled Hard, both of which focus on Claude Devereux, a Virginia banker who is recruited by the Confederate secret service and placed in the office of Union secretary of war Edwin Stanton. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

    Correspondent Lines: Poetry and Journalism in the U.S. Civil War, a Perspectives on History lecture by Eliza C. Richards, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Professor Richards discusses how new technologies influenced literary and journalistic accounts of the Civil War, changing Americans’ reactions to the news and the war itself. Approximate run time: 53 minutes

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    The Digitization of North Carolina USCT Roster, a lecture by Earl Ijames, North Carolina Museum of History, and Rhonda Jones, North Carolina Central University

    Ijames, the museum’s curator of African American and community history, and Professor Jones present the results of their efforts to digitize rosters listing African Americans from North Carolina who served in the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War. Approximate run time: 33 minutes.

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    Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the End of Slavery, a Lincoln Symposium lecture by Loren Schweninger, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

    Professor Schweninger sheds light on the relationship between Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln and how that relationship influenced Lincoln’s views on slavery. Fifth of six lectures. Approximate run time: 26 minutes.

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    History of the Emancipation Proclamation, an interview with Bruce Bustard, senior exhibits curator, National Archives and Records Administration Bustard discusses the history of the Emancipation Proclamation, Abraham Lincoln’s gradual evolution of thought about issuing the Proclamation, and the pursuit of a 13th Amendment to abolish slavery. Approximate run time: 30 minutes.

    Intelligence in the Civil War, a conversation with Clay Laurie, a historian at the CIA’s Center for the Study of Intelligence and a professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County

    Both the North and the South used intelligence, espionage, and reconnaissance to gather information. Dr. Clay Laurie discusses the role, impact, and development of military intelligence during the American Civil War. Approximate run time: 26 minutes.

    Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederacy: A Comparison, a Lincoln Symposium lecture by Paul D. Escott, Wake Forest University

    Professor Escott compares the political and leadership styles of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. Second of six lectures. Approximate run time: 56 minutes.

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    Lincoln as Military Commander, a Lincoln Symposium lecture by Joseph T. Glatthaar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Professor Glatthaar presents his views on Abraham Lincoln’s effectiveness as commander in chief. Third of six lectures. Approximate run time: 37 minutes.

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    Lincoln’s Legacy, a Lincoln Symposium lecture by Heather A. Williams, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Professor Williams discusses Abraham Lincoln’s legacy as viewed by African Americans. Last of six lectures. Approximate run time: 1 hour.

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    Lincoln’s Political Leadership: An Overview, a Lincoln Symposium lecture by William C. Harris, North Carolina State University

    Professor Emeritus Harris examines aspects of Abraham Lincoln’s legacy and leadership. First of six lectures. Approximate run time: 56 minutes.

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    Lynching in North Carolina, an interview with Vann Newkirk, assistant provost and dean of graduate studies, Alabama A&M University

    Newkirk discusses his book Lynching in North Carolina: A History, 1865–1941, and the impact of lynching and mob violence in North Carolina from just after the Civil War to the mid-1900s. Approximate run time: 34 minutes.

    The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War, an interview with historian and author Christian McWhirter

    During the Civil War, music accompanied soldiers almost everywhere they went. Regardless of race or ethnicity, it affected both soldiers and civilians. McWhirter discusses the impact of music in the war. He also explains how printed sheet music led to the birth of the modern American music industry. Approximate run time: 31 minutes.

    Race and Reunion: Has Civil War Memory United or Divided America?a keynote address by David Blight, Yale University

    One of the country’s leading historians on Civil War memory kicks off the first of three symposia commemorating the war’s 150th anniversary. Professor Blight discusses the influences that have impacted and shaped perceptions of race and history since the Civil War and what it means for America today. Approximate run time: 1 hour and 7 minutes.

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    The Roanoke Island Freedmen’s Colony, an interview with Patricia C. Click, professor emeritus in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia

    Professor Click discusses her research examining a second “Lost Colony” on Roanoke Island that occurred during, and shortly after, the American Civil War. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

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    The South’s Secret Weapons: Disease, Environment, and the Civil War, a Perspectives on History lecture by Margaret Humphreys, Duke University

    Confederate leaders hoped that fevers in the South would become potent weapons should Union forces invade, thus decimating their ranks. Humphreys explores the role of disease in the Civil War and emphasizes the Civil War-era understanding of how epidemiology became a part of the strategy on both sides. Approximate run time: 59 minutes.

    Podcast Suggested Reading List

    Union Soldiers and Civilians in Post–Civil War North Carolina, an interview with historian and author Mark Bradley

    Historian and author Mark Bradley discusses Bluecoats and Tar Heels: Soldiers and Civilians in Reconstruction North Carolina, his book that examines the interactions between Union soldiers and North Carolina civilians and the challenges that faced residents under Union occupation from 1865 to 1877. Approximate run time: 31 minutes.

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    United States Colored Troops, a Lincoln Symposium lecture by John David Smith, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    Professor Smith discusses the decision to recruit African Americans and the effect of the United States Colored Troops on the outcome of the Civil War. Fourth of six lectures. Approximate run time: 54 minutes

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    The Untold Civil War, a talk by James I. Robertson Jr., Alumni Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus, Virginia Tech University

    Robertson discusses compelling new stories from his book The Untold Civil War: Exploring the Human Side of War. His stories serve as alternatives to traditional battle narratives of the Civil War. Approximate run time: 1 hour 19 minutes.

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    Was I Born for This? North Carolina Slave Voices, a talk given by Lucinda MacKethan, Professor of English Emerita, North Carolina State University

    MacKethan discusses the way in which African American writers in the 19th century fought against slavery and racism using the power of the written word. She includes the narratives of Harriet Jacobs, Moses Roper, and Lunsford Lane and the poetry of George Moses Horton. Approximate run time: 1 hour 2 minutes.

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    When Will This Cruel War Be Over?,a talk by James M. McPherson, professor of history emeritus, Princeton University

    The Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and best-selling author discusses the failed attempts at peace negotiations during the American Civil War and considers why the conflict could only have ended with an unconditional military victory. Approximate run time: 1 hour 12 minutes.

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    Twentieth Century

    James R Walker Jr and North Carolina's Literacy Test, an interview with professor of history at Davidson College, John Wertheimer.

    Professor John Wertheimer discusses how he worked with his undergraduate students to research and write the story of a small town lawyer whose battles for Civil Rights led to challenging the State’s literacy test—all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Approximate run time: 50 minutes.

    Academic Freedom and Liberalism at UNC, an interview with historian and author Charles Holden

    Historian Charles Holden discusses The New Southern University: Academic Freedom and Liberalism at UNC, his book about how changes at UNC–Chapel Hill during the 1920s, '30s, and '40s transformed UNC into one of the South’s premiere universities and fostered a progressive and liberal orientation within a conservative region. Approximate run time: 29 minutes.

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    Biotechnology and the Challenges of Agriculture, a conversation with Dr. Mary-Dell Chilton, World Food Prize Laureate and founding director and distinguished science fellow at Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.

    Dr. Chilton talks about spending part of her childhood growing up in North Carolina, her work producing the first transgenic (genetically engineered) plants, and her role in creating a world-class research facility at Research Triangle Park. Approximate run time: 36 minutes.

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    Cotton Mill Colic: Songs of Labor from the North Carolina Piedmont, a talk and performance featuring Gregg Kimball, Sheryl Warner, and Jackie Frost

    Historian and musician Gregg Kimball, guitarist and singer Sheryl Warner, and singer Jackie Frost discuss the history of mill songs and perform selected songs by North Carolina mill workers. Approximate run time: 1 hour.

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    Cruel Summer: The Attack on Camp Summerlane, an interview with writer and author Jon Elliston

    Jon Elliston discusses his award-winning articles and an upcoming book about Camp Summerlane. In the summer of 1963, what was envisioned as an experimental camp and school in western North Carolina was violently attacked and closed just one week after opening by an angry mob from the nearby town of Rosman. Approximate run time: 32 minutes.

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    The Durham Manifesto, a conversation with Ray Gavins, professor of history, Duke University

    Gavins discusses the historic Southern Conference on Race Relations (held in Durham in October 1942) and its platform statement, which became known as the Durham Manifesto—one publication that became a catalyst of civil rights initiatives for the American South. Approximate run time: 26 minutes.

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    The Eugenics Movement and North Carolina,an interview with historian and author Rebecca M. Kluchin, California State University, Sacramento

    Rebecca M. Kluchin, historian and author of Fit to Be Tied: Sterilization and Reproductive Rights in America, 1950–1980, discusses the troubling history and legacy of the eugenics movement and the approximately 7,600 people forcibly sterilized in North Carolina from 1929 to 1977. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

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    Freemasonry in North Carolina, an interview with Michael Brantley, Grand Historian of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free & Accepted Masons of North Carolina

    Brantley discusses Freemasonry in the Tar Heel State and describes two large murals by artist Allyn Cox in the Grand Lodge that depict key events and figures in its history. Approximate run time: 26 minutes.

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    Jim Hunt: A Biography, a conversation with author Gary Pearce

    In the late 20th century, no one dominated North Carolina politics like Governor Jim Hunt. Author Gary Pearce, who served as Hunt’s press secretary and a close political adviser, discusses his new book and provides lucid insight on Hunt’s life and career. Approximate run time: 27 minutes.

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    The Life and Times of Robert Rice Reynolds, an interview with historian and author Julian Pleasants

    Before his controversial ideas and dramatic lifestyle made him unpopular with voters, Reynolds was a colorful and suave Senator who represented North Carolina from 1933 to 1945. Approximate run time: 30 minutes.

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    Lewis Hine and Child Labor in America, a conversation with Hugh Hindman, professor of labor and human resources, Appalachian State University

    Professor Hindman discusses the history of child labor in the United States, the recruitment of families by textile mills in North Carolina, and the impact of Lewis Hine and other progressive activists on child labor legislation. Approximate run time: 25 minutes.

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    Lewis Hine as Social Critic

    In the most thorough examination of Lewis Hine and his photography to date, historian Kate Sampsell-Willmann’s recent book, Lewis Hine as Social Critic, examines Hine’s work as art, history, philosophy, and social commentary and provides new insights into Lewis Hine as activist, social commentator, and photographer. Approximate run time: 27 minutes.

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    Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation, a lecture by Malinda Lowery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    On November 21, 2009, historian Malinda Lowery presented a talk in conjunction with the museum’s 14th annual American Indian Heritage Celebration. An associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lowery is the author of several books and worked as a producer and director on several award-winning documentary films. In her talk, she discusses the history and struggles, including the longtime pursuit of federal recognition of the Lumbee tribe. Approximate run time: 1 hour 4 minutes.

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    Lynching in North Carolina, an interview with Vann Newkirk, assistant provost and dean of graduate studies, Alabama A&M University

    Newkirk discusses his book Lynching in North Carolina: A History, 1865–1941, and the impact of lynching and mob violence in North Carolina from just after the Civil War to the mid-1900s. Approximate run time: 34 minutes.

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    On Earth’s Furrowed Brow, a conversation with Tim Barnwell, photographer and author

    Tim Barnwell discusses his experiences photographing small family farms and the individuals that work them in the mountains of western North Carolina. Barnwell’s photos are featured in the exhibit On Earth’s Furrowed Brow: The Appalachian Farm in Photographs. Approximate run time: 25 minutes.

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    Prisoners of War in North Carolina, a conversation with Robert Billinger Jr., professor of history and political science emeritus, Wingate University

    From 1942 to 1946, North Carolina was home to 10,000 German POWs. Historian Robert Billinger talks about the network of POW installations in North Carolina and shares stories about some of its prisoners. Approximate run time: 33 minutes.

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    Rising to the Challenge: Women in Public Office, a panel discussion moderated by Melissa A. Essary, dean of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, Campbell University, Raleigh

    The program highlighted the current status and future for women in public office. Panelists discussed how things have changed over the past several decades and the keys to women's future success. Approximate run time: 1 hour 6 minutes.

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    Sam Ervin and Watergate: 40 Years Later, a panel discussion examining the role and legacy of North Carolina Senator Sam Ervin

    Author and historian Karl Campbell (Appalachian State University), moderator, leads two distinguished guests in trading stories about senator Sam Ervin and his central role in the Senate Watergate Committee hearings. Panelists include Rufus Edmisten (former Sam Ervin staffer and deputy chief counsel for the committee) and Sam Ervin IV (Court of Appeals judge and grandson). Approximate run time: 59 minutes.

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    Shattering White Solidarity: A History of the Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union, a Perspectives on History lecture by Elizabeth Anne Payne, University of Mississippi

    Payne examines the history of the Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union (STFU) through the story of white sharecropper and activist Myrtle Lawrence. In September 1939, journalist Priscilla Robertson and photographer Louise Boyle spent 10 days documenting Lawrence’s life and the harsh and deplorable living and working conditions of white and black sharecroppers in the Arkansas cotton belt. Approximate run time: 1 hour 14 minutes.

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    Sugar of the Crop, a presentation by Sana Butler

    Journalist and author Sana Butler spent nearly ten years crisscrossing the country locating the last surviving African Americans whose parents were born in slavery. In this poignant and moving presentation, Butler discusses and reads from her book Sugar of the Crop. Approximate run time: 44 minutes.

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    Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson, an interview with author and historian Susan Burch

    Historian Susan Burch discusses her 2007 book (which she coauthored with Hannah Joyner) about a deaf African American man, who was unjustly labeled as insane and confined to an asylum in Goldsboro, NC, for nearly 70 years. Approximate run time: 30 minutes.

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    Watergate: Political Scandal & the Presidency, an interview with historian and author Stanley Kutler

    To mark the 40th anniversary of the Senate Select Committee hearings that investigated President Nixon’s 1972 reelection campaign, Watergate historian Stanley Kutler discusses the lasting historical and political significance of America’s most noted and studied political scandal. Approximate run time: 29 minutes.

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    What the Negro Wants: The Unified Call to End Segregation in America,a conversation with Kenneth R. Janken, professor of Afro-American and Diaspora Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Published in 1944 by UNC Press, the book What the Negro Wants was the first united call by African American intelligentsia to end segregation. Janken discusses the book’s history, its contents and immediate impact, and its lasting significance. Approximate run time: 27 minutes.

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    Workboats of Core Sound, a conversation with Lawrence S. Earley, photographer

    Earley traveled throughout the Core Sound region of North Carolina taking photographs of fishermen and the boats that have supported a way of life for generations. He discusses the struggles, rewards, and future of a community whose fate is tied to the ocean. Earley’s photos are featured in the exhibit Workboats of Core Sound. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

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    Exhibits

    Behind the Veneer: Thomas Day, Master Cabinetmaker, a conversation with Patricia Phillips Marshall, curator of decorative arts at the North Carolina Museum of History

    Thomas Day was a free man of color who owned and operated one of North Carolina’s largest cabinet shops prior to the Civil War. The museum’s exhibit Behind the Veneer: Thomas Day, Master Cabinetmaker showcases furniture crafted by this accomplished artisan and entrepreneur from Milton, Caswell County, and explores the extraordinary story of a man who succeeded and flourished despite shrinking freedoms for free people of color in antebellum North Carolina. Approximate run time: 27 minutes

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    A Call to Arms, a conversation with Tom Belton, North Carolina Museum of History

    Belton, the museum’s curator of military history, talks about two Civil War battle flags—one carried by the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops, the other by the 18th North Carolina. These flags are currently on view in the exhibit A Call to Arms. Approximate run time: 19 minutes.

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    Community and Culture: North Carolina Indians Past and Present

    A student from Exploris Charter Middle School in Raleigh discusses the American Indian game of stickball, featured in the exhibit Community and Culture: North Carolina Indians Past and Present. Approximate run time: 2 minutes.

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    Down Home: Jewish Life in North Carolina, a conversation with Leonard Rogoff, curator and historian for the Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina

    The exhibit documents and presents more than 400 years of Jewish life in North Carolina. Produced and organized by the Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina (JHFNC), Down Home chronicles how Jews have integrated into Tar Heel life by blending their own traditions into southern culture, while preserving their ethnic and religious traditions. Approximate run time: 28 minutes.

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    Elected to Serve: North Carolina’s Governors, a conversation with Louise Benner and RaeLana Poteat, North Carolina Museum of History

    Benner and Poteat, co-curators of the exhibit Elected to Serve: North Carolina’s Governors, discuss the state’s past chief executives (including provincial, royal, and democratically elected governors), as well as first ladies’ inaugural gowns featured in the exhibit. Approximate run time: 22 minutes.

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    Everyday Artistry, a conversation with Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History

    Bell-Kite, curator of the exhibit Everyday Artistry, talks about how ordinary utilitarian objects can eventually be viewed as works of art. Approximate run time: 17 minutes.

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    History of the Harvest, an interview with Duane Martin, PhD, agronomist with Syngenta

    The museum’s new outdoor exhibit, History of the Harvest, features plants and crops that examine the past, present, and future of agriculture both locally and globally. Approximate run time: 24 minutes

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    John Lawson’s Exploration of the Carolinas, a conversation with Jeanne Marie Warzeski, North Carolina Museum of History

    John Lawson an English explorer, surveyor, and naturalist, journeyed through the Carolinas backcountry in 1701 and 1702. To commemorate the 300th anniversary of the publication of Lawson’s A New Voyage to Carolina, the North Carolina Museum of History opened a new exhibit, A New Land, "A New Voyage": John Lawson’s Exploration of Carolina.” Warzeski, curator of colonial and antebellum history, discusses John Lawson’s contributions to history and natural science. Approximate run time: 22 minutes.

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    On Earth’s Furrowed Brow, a conversation with Tim Barnwell, photographer and author

    Tim Barnwell discusses his experiences photographing small family farms and the individuals that work them in the mountains of western North Carolina. Barnwell’s photos are featured in the exhibit On Earth’s Furrowed Brow: The Appalachian Farm in Photographs. Approximate run time: 25 minutes.

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    The Real George Washington, a conversation with Carol Cadou, senior curator, and Sabrina Hiedemann, exhibition coordinator, at George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens

    Few figures in American history are as well-known and respected as George Washington. Discover the Real George Washington: New Views from Mount Vernon is a traveling exhibition that examines Washington’s legacy and provides new perspectives on Washington aside from his more prominent careers as general and president. Approximate run time: 30 minutes.

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    Real to Reel: The Making of Gone with the Wind, an interview with collector James Tumblin

    Former head of Universal Studios makeup and hair department, James Tumblin owns the largest private collection of memorabilia associated with the 1939 film Gone with the Wind. Approximate run time: 25 minutes

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    Rural Revival: Photographs of Home and Preservation of Place, a conversation with photographer and historic preservation advocate Scott Garlock

    Garlock uses photography to capture long-forgotten homeplaces, churches, schools, and other community landmarks. His love of history, architecture, and place comes together to help showcase, document, and—in some cases—save historic structures. Approximate run time: 27 minutes.

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    In Search of a New Deal, a conversation with Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, and Emily Catherman, Historic Oak View Park

    From 1935 to 1941 the Farm Security Administration’s photographic project provided an unparalleled documentary record of how the Great Depression and the New Deal affected rural North Carolinians. Diana Bell-Kite, associate curator at the North Carolina Museum of History, and Emily Catherman, park manager at Historic Oak View Park discuss the museum’s exhibit In Search of a New Deal, Images of North Carolina 1935-1941. Approximate run time: 30 minutes.

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    Stories of Stagville Plantation, a conversation with photographer and guest curator Brenda Scott

    Scott talks about her efforts to document the places and people—past and present—of Stagville Plantation near Durham. Her work has resulted in thousands of photographs and oral histories of descendants of Stagville’s enslaved residents. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

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    A Thousand Words: Photographs by Vietnam Veterans, a conversation with Martin Tucker

    Pphotographer Tucker, curator of the traveling exhibit A Thousand Words: Photographs by Vietnam Veterans, talks about the exhibit’s creation. The exhibit, which completed its run at the North Carolina Museum of History in late April 2009. Approximate run time: 16 minutes.

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    Workboats of Core Sound, a conversation with Lawrence S. Earley, photographer

    Earley traveled throughout the Core Sound region of North Carolina taking photographs of fishermen and the boats that have supported a way of life for generations. He discusses the struggles, rewards, and future of a community whose fate is tied to the ocean. Earley’s photos are featured in the exhibit Workboats of Core Sound. Approximate run time: 24 minutes.

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    Other

    Anarchy and the Historic House Museum, a conversation with Frank Vagnone, coauthor, Anarchist’s Guide to Historic House Museums

    Vagnone talks about his school days as a Tar Heel Junior Historian (a program sponsored by the Museum of History), innovative ways to make historic house museums and cultural properties more relevant to current audiences and communities, and the need for students to become advocates for history and historic preservation. Approximate run time: 34 minutes.

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    The Banjo: A Cultural History, a Perspectives on History lecture by Laurent Marc Dubois, Duke University

    Dubois shares the storied history of the banjo, an instrument whose development was marked by wide cultural encounters from Africa to the Caribbean and North America, contributing to an incredibly rich variety of musical traditions. Approximate run time: 1 hour 6 minutes

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    Collecting North Carolina: The North Carolina Collection, a discussion with Bob Anthony, Curator, North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Since 1844 the University of North Carolina has collected artifacts, papers, books, currency, photographs, and other items that tell the stories of North Carolina’s social and material culture. Approximate run time: 31 minutes.

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    Conservation and the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, a discussion with Terry Boone, exhibits conservator, National Archives and Records Administration

    Boone discusses methods used by curators, conservators, and research scientists to preserve irreplaceable records and artifacts such as the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. Approximate run time: 26 minutes.

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    The History of Banking in North Carolina, an interview with Lissa Broome, author, attorney, and professor of banking and law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Lissa Broome talks about the past, present, and future of banking in North Carolina and discusses why banking has remained an important industry both economically and politically. Approximate run time: 23 minutes.

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    North Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times,a conversation with Michele Gillespie, professor of Southern History, at Wake Forest University

    Michele Gillespie and her co-editor Sally McMillen of Davidson College have finished the first book in a two-volume set examining important North Carolina women. The books are part of a growing effort to address the scarcity of women in traditional history books and manuscripts. Approximate run time: 30 minutes.

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    The State Library of North Carolina, an interview with state librarian Cal Shepard

    The State Library of North Carolina provides a large variety of vital services to citizens throughout the state. Find out about the State Library’s past, present, and future. Approximate run time: 25 minutes.

    Podcast

    Over 200 Years of Family Ballads, an interview with Sheila Kay Adams, balladeer, musician, author, and storyteller

    Sheila Kay Adams talks about performing and preserving the songs that have been handed down through her family since the mid-1700s. Approximate run time: 21 minutes.

    Podcast